SWG CGL: Outdoor Woodworking Deck Contractors

Jun 2020

Deck and fence contractors design and build custom outdoor decks and patios. These professionals are typically called upon for large-scale or complex as well as simple projects - decks large enough to accommodate large groups or multiple areas (e.g. for dining and lounging), partially partitioned or covered for privacy or seasonal purposes, multi-tiered decks, patios with hot tubs and other water features, patios with outdoor kitchens, and more.


SWG PL: E&O a Logical Choice for Mechanical and Electrical Engineers

Jun 2020

If an engineer makes a mistake, or is accused of making a mistake, errors and omissions (E&O) is the only type of business insurance that will cover their legal costs if they are sued.


SWG ENVIRO: Should Contractors Carry Environmental Liability Coverage?

Jun 2020

In 2018, more than 1.4 million Canadians were employed in construction trades and professions and their combined work was worth $241 billion a year, according to BuildForce Canada (1). In this diverse industry, contract workers may be involved in construction, renovation, maintenance, plumbing, or landscaping - or a combination of those jobs, depending on the project and type of contractor. In each case, contractors are often required to remediate and haul hazardous materials.


SWG Secure: How Monitoring Services are Changing Commercial Security

Jun 2020

Unforeseen circumstances can put strain on resources in any industry, and the demands created by COVID-19 have put the security industry under considerable pressure.


SWG PL – Media/Multi-Media - Tailored Coverage for Canada’s Rapidly Changing Internet Media Market

May 2020

New threats from the rapid changes in the media/multimedia industry are outpacing traditional insurance policies. In this market, coverage needs are constantly shifting as new trends emerge; meanwhile, Canadian rules and regulations struggle to keep up.


SWG ENVIRO - Preparing Your Client for a Surprise Site Pollution Claim

May 2020

In December of last year, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the forest-product company Resolute was liable for damages from a mercury-contaminated waste disposal site near Ontario’s Grassy Narrows First Nation. A pulp-and-paper facility dumped toxic materials from chemical processing into the waste disposal site, which contaminated the nearby river system in the 1960s. And though the property had changed ownership several times over the last six decades, the federal government denied Resolute’s bid for indemnity and held the company liable for covering the costs of maintaining the disposal site. (1)